Tag Archives: Macmillan Children’s Books

I received this book for free from the publisher via Netgalley. This in no way affects my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

All the RageAll the Rage by Courtney Summers (Macmillan Children's Books, 28 January 2016)

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Courtney Summers is incredible. Her writing is incisive, powerful, startling. The only other book I've read of hers is her debut, CRACKED UP TO BE (published in 2008), which I also enjoyed, but her writing has come a long way since then. ALL THE RAGE is sickeningly honest, and that's obviously meant as a compliment to Summers. I don't know how she does it. How she carves the truth onto every page of fiction.

Romy Grey was raped by Kellan Turner, one of the sheriff's sons. No one believes her, because everyone knows she wanted him. She's lost her best friend, Penny, the most popular girl in school. They all bully her now and call her a liar and a slut and worse. She finds a job out of town where no one will know about what happened to her, and it's there that she meets Leon. Leon likes her, and she likes him back, but nothing can be so simple as that anymore, and it's a struggle to keep him separate and distant from everything else in her life. But when Penny goes missing after the biggest party of the year and Romy wakes up on the side of the road with no memory of the night before, things get even more complicated and Romy finds it increasingly difficult to keep her life from unravelling further.

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I received this book for free from the publisher via Netgalley. This in no way affects my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Dark LightThe Dark Light by Julia Bell (Macmillan Children's Books, 16 July 2015)

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Okay, so, I must admit, though I have never read any books about cults, I've always thought that they probably wouldn't be my thing. There seem to be quite a lot of YA books about cults lately, and I didn't want to read any of them, but when I saw THE DARK LIGHT, it caught my eye because of the LGBTQ content in the synopsis – two girls sharing a kiss. That definitely piqued my interest. However, after reading this book, I think I'd do better to stay away from books about cults in the future, even if they're LGBTQ.

When Alex commits arson as revenge for being bullied at school, she is sent to a Christian island community for the summer to learn how to make a fresh start and stay out of trouble. Pastor Bevins will help her, they say. Among the first group of believers she meets to take her to the island is Rebekah, a girl her age who's grown up on the island and knows hardly anything about the outside world. When Alex arrives at the island, she realises that things are a lot more complicated and sinister than she expected, and all she wants to do is go home. Pastor Bevins insists that the Rapture is coming soon, and he is the kind of man who will stop at no costs. As Alex and Rebekah develop feelings for each other, Rebekah is forced to question everything she's ever known. Can the two of them escape the island before it's too late?

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I received this book for free from the publisher via Netgalley. This in no way affects my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Lie TreeThe Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge (Macmillan Children's Books, 7 May 2015)

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I'd been meaning to read a book by Frances Hardinge for a while now, and when I saw that she had a new book coming out and it was available for review on Netgalley, I had to request it! And I'm so glad I did. If all of Hardinge's books are amazing as this one then I am definitely going to have to read all of them!

THE LIE TREE is set in the Victorian period, several years after the publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species. Faith Sunderley's father is a disgraced natural scientist, whose reputation has been ruined after the news comes out that his fossil finds were fakes. He moves his whole family to the island of Vane, just off the coast of England, to escape from the scandal for a while and to assist with an excavation there. When he is found dead, everyone thinks it's a suicide – but Faith suspects differently. Armed with her father's journal and his secrets about the Tree of Lies, Faith sets about trying to discover the truth about her father's death.

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